Emma Lucek

Net-Work
F T L E I V L

22. – 28 Mai 2017

Net-Workers:

1 Sander Molenaar

2 Mathieu Bujnowskyi

3 Dieuwertje Luitse

4 Max Frischknecht

5 Krzysztof Pyda

Katrin Krumm

Romain Cazier

Annika Frye

9 Anais Bloch and Nicolas Nova

10 Maya Ober

11 Emma Lucek

ABOUT

Net-work asked Emma Lucek, a designer, researcher, visual information enthusiast and recent graduate from Design Academy Eindhoven, to take over our Instagram account and interfere with the contemporary design discourse from her own perspective.

#networkdepotbasel #net-work #depotbaselnetwork #onlinedepot #mayaober #depatriarchisedesign #design #feminism #designdiscourse

Depot Basel’s Instagram

Meet Emma Lucek, the next Net-Worker, who will narrate a topic of her interest in 14 posts in the next days. Emma is a designer, researcher and visual information enthusiast. After gaining experience at Superpool in Istanbul and Central Warsaw she moved from city stories connected to an anthropologist perspective to the world of image-making, visual culture and technology. We expect to see a combination of it all here. #emmalucek @superpoolorg @design_academy_eindhoven #emmalucek #manandpublicspace #citiestellstories #cityasmemoryspace #readingurbanism #commemorativegesture
Hey guys, @emmalucek here! Let's get stuck right in! Deconstruction of Seeing. Let's begin this journey of looking into the effect of technology on the evolution of visual language by reaffirming what we've learned from John Berger. In his book Ways of Seeing, published initially in 1972, the principal aim had been to start a process of questioning. It's important to remember that an image is a sight that has been recreated or reproduced. "It's an appearance or set of appearances that has been detached from the place and time in which it first made its appearance." That also means that we see this image, not only out of its' original context, but also through our own set of lenses. This inherently differentiates the experience of consuming an image and the experience of reality. Keep in mind that I won't be categorising these layers in a hierarchal way, because I don't believe they belong in one such structure, only unpacking then in order to look at them more closely. Collages and insight by Emma Lucek feat. John Berger #emmalucek #depotbasel #johnberger #placeforcontemporarydesign #depotbaselnetwork #waysofseeing #relationalaesthetics #perception
This decade saw an unprecedented proliferation of new museums dedicated to contemporary art, this has been coupled with an increase in scale and a proximity to big business. This has helped shift the 19th century model of the museum from an institution of elite culture to its current incarnation as a populist temple of leisure and entertainment. Today, when viewing art in a museum, this profound encounter with a work of art has been subordinated to a new kind of experience - the hyper-reality of its architectural container, which produces effects of disembodiment that, in the view of art historian and author of the 1990 essay The Cultural Logic of the Late Capitalist Museum, Rosalind Krauss "correlates to the dematerialised flows of global capital." This leaves art two options - to look ever more lost inside gigantic, post-industrial hangars, or to supersize to compete with its envelope. Does that mean that rather than a highly individualised artistic epiphany, viewers encounter a euphoria of the space first and art second? To what extend does the museum context add or detract from the experience of viewing artwork? Is the museum a natural or neutral habitat for housing and experiencing art? In what ways can/does the museum position itself - both in the present and the past? What about the future? Does the historical context of established museums add helpful layers of context to experiencing contemporary art? What is the purest way of experiencing art? Is there even such a thing! Collage and insight by @emmalucek feat. Rosalind Krauss and Claire Bishop #emmalucek #depotbasel #depotbaselnetwork #placeforcontemporarydesign #context #museum #arthistory #artfuture
"All that was once directly lived has become mere representation." Guy Debord 1967. When addressing the topic of art in this age, it's crucial to differentiate between art online and online art. There are several layers to this distinction, again, in no hierarchal order - physical work in museums, reproductions of that physical work as an image online (on artists' websites, social media), work that has been made by, for and using the internet that remains intangible, there is digital artwork shown in museums as an experiential, interactive form of art, online 3D walkthroughs of physical museums, and so on. I use the "and so on" because this list of various interweavings of the physical and the online is not exhaustive, but is ever developing, and I myself am still understanding the nuances and differences of each. This constant development in ways these worlds cross pollinate means that we do have to try to develop an aesthetic for this new digital art, a way by which we can determine which of it is good, which of it is crap and which of it is essential. What we think is great art articulates ultimately to what we think is valuable in culture. This also means that we as folks on the internet but also collectors, dealers étal need to increase their literacy when it comes to viewing and valuing art made for or merely circulated on the web, because increasingly the web is the place of the first encounter of an artists work. So maybe the aesthetic value of internet art can be measured by jts' ability to help us see and understand our culture through the internet, just as a novel can help us see language or an image can help us see reality. This brings me back to a question from the previous post - what is the purest way of experiencing art? Is there even such a thing! Collages and insight by @emmalucek feat. the Internet. #emmalucek #depotbasel #depotbaselnetwork #placeforcontemporarydesign #arthistory #artfuture #context
Online porn is killing good sex. Today I will be making a case for and against the notion that social media is killing art. Buckle up. Like spectacle, art seduces, frightens, insights, déranges. Art being shared on social media (please note that I'm making a distinction between social media and the internet as a whole) can be divided into two categories - the cognitive and the retinal. Today's social media dictates the nature of our cultural consumption and that means that our aesthetics are changing. Retinal art, so the shiny stuff, along with the collapse of time (we only have 3-5 seconds to absorb an image and our attention span has fallen to 8 seconds) means a worrying decrease in our capacity for critical discourse. Visual language is being condensed and people are forgetting how to approach art in a human way. Alongside this, social media enables and facilitates plagiarism and skews our perceptions of reality. In addition, there is a perverse moral police that doesn't account for nuance or sensitivity, and as a result art and authenticity are at stake. Social media platforms were creased as spaces for community based interactive content sharing, but this utopian manifesto has collapsed into a rubble of vacuous narcissism, fake news and poorly disguised advertising. We have the illusion (or is it really so?) that social media decentralises power, when the corporations that own these platforms are gathering our algorithms and data, at an enormous profit. They are giving us back an echo chamber representation of ourselves. There is no truth is social media, because it is you talking back to yourself, in a series of quotations appropriated from something someone said before to someone else. By projecting ourselves in such inauthentic ways, our interactions with each other become inauthentic, interfering with our ability to engage in meaningful dialogue. This has radically transformed the proliferation and consumption of contemporary art that relies on nuance, complexity and tension. Collages and insight by @emmalucek. #emmalucek #depotbasel #depotbaselnetwork #placeforcontemporarydesign #socialmedia #artfuture #arthistory
And now for the counter - social media and art are cultural forms and they cannot kill each other; they can only breed and create hybrid forms. As John Gerard says "death is not a possibility, only change." It is a populist position to suggest that there was a most idyllic time to think about art, or to see art in a more rarified situation, completely ignoring and negating social medias potential to cut through the oppressiveness of the privileges of class, race and economy. Free conversation and free networking give us opportunities and disrupt existing paradigms of thought and have brought tyrannical forces to their knees. Social media is an open platform that is (arguably) democratic, it's a network, it creates (occasionally elitist) communities, and allows artists to see their work in broader socio-economic contexts. Digital artist James Bridal (more on him later) is keen on conveying the message that "computation is now everywhere, it is layered over everything and we are living inside that computer as well." That means that much of our digital Internet art is focused on itself, on the visible, and more importantly, invisible aspects of that network that surrounds us. The aesthetics of Internet art, art made with, for or using the Internet, won't conform to any that we've known before; that's fitting because a lot of this work is made unlike any that came before it. It's made with algorithms,m or code, they're just a set of instructions, but what they achieve can be transformative and moving. As discussed in the previous post, there are many ways that the use and proliferation of art on social media is problematic, but it cannot ultimately kill art. Kevin Kelly gives me hope when he writes "all is flux - this never ending change is the pivotal axis of the modern world." We don't have time or space for dogma or stasis. The art world has been and will continue evolving and creating hybrid forms. This, as mentioned before, necessarily means that we will need to increase literacy when it comes to these evolving forms, but we also need to develop an aesthetic by which we can assess value. Collages and insights by @emmalucek #emmalucek #depotbasel
What is post-internet art? Does the post-internet refer to a sense of continuity more than it does to a sense of rupture? Does the post refer to the idea that we are aware of the internet on a cellular, muscular level? Could you be an artist practicing today without an awareness of the Internet? Of the post? Was the term post-internet born in the wild? Is there a double layering of the post-internet? Is it defined by the characteristic of the historical moment, or the fact of the prosaic nature of the universality of the Internet? Is the prevalence of the Internet going unquestioned? And has artistic practice not yet caught up with social realities? Does the idea of post-Internet art stem back to surrealism? Does it reveal a desire to turn to the sheer joy of the bizarre? Does post-Internet art break up the banality of universal culture that has been spread by the Internet? Collage and questions by @emmalucek #emmalucek #depotbasel #depotbaselnetwork #placeforcontemporarydesign #arthistory #artfuture #postinternet #postinternetart
We're looking at a new set of digital, cultural, technological and social possibilities, and we maintain a desire to explore possible definitions and implications of the post-Internet. Is post-Internet art hinged on the appropriation, the adaptation of images for new purposes? Does it, on a political level, bring us back to institutional critique? Is the critique of post-internet art accurate when it suggests that the post-internet is a way of making objects out of what was once an idea based world? Was that the ideal of 1990s net art? How does the post-internet differ from net-art? Does they differ because one of them is closer to the commercial art world? Is net-art a self referential genre in both the best and worst senses? Was video art the first step into the aesthetics of post-internet art? How does the visual vernacular differ? How has it evolved? In his text published in 2006 entitled Painting Beside Itself, David Joselit investigates the question of how a painting can belong to a network. This question was initially posed by Martin Kippenberger in the late 1990s, but I came across it when reading Joselit. Interestingly, Joselit's text is mostly about artists addressing it outside the canvas. This cuts right to the essence of the issue at hand - do we believe that the painting can take place on the canvas, or do we need to step outside of it? What does it mean for painting to be socially positioned? What does it mean for a social network that creates the artwork to also be involved in the circulation and reception of artwork? And now what does that mean in the context of the internet, net-art and post-internet art? (If you didn't hate the term "post-internet art" already, I'm sure you do now that I've beaten it to death.) Collages and insight by @emmalucek feat. David Joselit and Martin Kippenberger #emmalucek #depotbasel #depotbaselnetwork #placeforcontemporarydesign #internetart #postinternetart #netart #theart #arthistory #artfuture
Where has identity landed in the post-internet matrix? We have this almost radicalised verrions of identity politics that's situated between the real and the virtual. This of course comes from, in some degree, trans-humanism and queer theory, but is ultimately based on the idea that the subject can interact as a very different kind of subject through computer vision or on social media. It can manifest itself in very banal forms, like changing your name and identity on Facebook or we can use the example of Petra Cortright and her piece Webcam, in which she played with these floating graphics moving across the screen for, essentially, the first time (now we are all familiar with Snapchat, Facebook call that allow us to be dogs, bears, monstrous bunnies etc.) and how these elements become a kind of adornment, and it changes the way the body can be presented. It could be used as a tool for active feminism, or it could be used as a tool for the objectification of the female form. You have an intense number of possibilities here, which interestingly aren't inherently politicised until they enter a particular form of artistic practice. I think the key here is that identity politics has become transitional, it has become about action rather than identity. It's become about representation and acting, what someone can be rather than what they inherently are. Collages and insight by @emmalucek feat. Petra Cortright #emmalucek #depotbasel #depotbaselnetwork #placeforcontemporarydesign #identity #identitypolitics #transitional #flux #flux #flux
It would be difficult to be making work about the post-internet condition without considering the tie between documentation and materiality on some level. How has the universalisation of Internet culture affected our daily life? Let's consider this question in the context of the notion of language - the development of international art English in curatorial discourse, which is a bit more distant from some of the rougher, more exciting writing about art, but the benefit of which is the ease with which it is to circulate between places and contexts, and to continue building a shared vocabulary. In a way, it moves far past language that is tied to art, because now we're also referring to visual languages, signs, symbols, emoticons and other phenomena that have taken on lives of their own. In a similar vein, the body is very closely linked to language. What does the intellectual evolution of the post-internet mean for the physical evolutions of the human body? How are language and the body extending in new directions? Arguably, machine vision is probably one of the most important ideas to come out of the idea of the new aesthetic - seeing how the machine sees, how are we being interpreted by our machines can be broadly expanded in a philosophical sense to how our computers and robots are seeing us, but then I have to wonder, how are our paintings and chairs seeing us? Collages and insight by @emmalucek feat. the maddening folly that is the internet #emmalucek #depotbasel #depotbaselnetwork #placeforcontemporarydesign #machines #devices #perception #extendablebodies #evolvinglangauge
Beitragende
Emma Lucek

Designer
Bezogen
Anais Bloch & Nicolas Nova

Net-Work

Annika Frye

Net-Work

Dieuwertje Luitse

Net-Work

Jing He

Net-Work

Katrin Krumm

Net-Work

Krzysztof Pyda

Net-Work

Mathieu Bujnowskyj

Net-Work

Max Frischknecht

Net-Work

Maya Ober

Net-Work

NET – Work

Net-Work

Romain Cazier

Net-Work

Sander Molenaar

Net-Work