Design Date with Marcus Fairs

Palazzo Clerici, Milan
F T L E I V L

04. April 2017

14:00 – 14:30

Host

Matylda Krzykowski

Guest

Marcus Fairs

Contestants

Olle Lundin
Floriane Misslin
Pleun van Dijk

Graphic Design

Sylvan Lanz

Key Element

Orlando Lovell

Title Music

Romderful

Voice

Emma Lucek

Setting

Edan Gorlicki
Kristofers Reidzans
Govert Flint

Thank you to

Jan Boelen
Gabrielle Kennedy

A B O U T

Design Date is a live version of the British Tv Show “Blind Date”, where you don’t look for a romantic partner but a partner in your professional life – it is all about charming and being charmed.

For Design Academy Eindhoven’s #TVClerici show at Palazzo Clerici this year, Depot Basel was invited to host Design Date for their show centred around media.

On the 4th of April Marcus Fairs came to find his match on the topic of “Body and Identity”. Job sent in three questions in advance and the contestants prepared their answers in a written out script.

Design Date with Marcus Fairs at Salone del Mobile Milano at #TVClerici in Palazzo Clerici

S C R I P T

Body and Identity – Marcus Fairs
Tuesday 4th April

Florianne Misslin

Do you consider physical appearance to be a talent and if so how does it rank in comparison to other talents?

Taste is a social skill to me. It is the understanding of what the public opinion prefers and the ability to reproduce it. The skill to play with it, merge with different contexts to always aim for favorable encounters with strangers is definitely a talent. It is comparable to any others; you gain it from education and training. And I am of course talking about the staging of the body, however it looks like.

Society seems conflicted on notions of beauty, on the one hand describing it as “skin deep” and criticising a preoccupation with looks, but on the other celebrating it in all forms of culture. Where do you stand in this debate?

I definitely do not consider beauty, appearance or identity as a skin deep issue. My work is all about communicating the impact that appearance has on our understanding of each others. Dress and identity are relatives to culture and society, but are also a matter of emotions—good and bad—matter of comfort and discomfort, matter of self-expression within our communities. Realising that appearance is a reality and not a superficiality will allow us to play further with it.

Do you use different value criteria when judging the appearance of people, objects and animals? Why is that and can you give examples, both positive and negative?

I judge the appearance of anyone based on its context. Relative to the culture it is from, to the location it grows in, to the knowledge it has access to. Why? Because your identity is a reflection of your sociocultural context. I don’t have positive or negative examples, there is a reason for everything so I am actually not judging but only criticizing.

Olle Lundin

Do you consider physical appearance to be a talent and if so how does it rank in comparison to other talents?

I don’t consider my physical appearance to be a talent but i have seen some people who in deed work their talent through their physical appearance – however, my idea of it it has nothing to do with the general ideas of “good-looking” – they just rock it! And in comparison to other talents I rather put emphasis on other elements, wittyness or being snappy – pun-talent maybe?

Society seems conflicted on notions of beauty, on the one hand describing it as “skin deep” and criticising a preoccupation with looks, but on the other celebrating it in all forms of culture. Where do you stand in this debate?

I’m sitting no? And I sit firmly with my ass on this chair thinking that we are all here with our bodies and that beauty is more in the eyes of the beholder, but also just in your manners – when it comes to beauty I feel that language and charm is more important than good-looking-ness. Beauty as such, and maybe aspiring “too much “ towards beauty or perfection is inherently boring. – but then i’ll have to explain “too much” also! And the idea of beauty has to transcend beyond a general idea of that and into how you, as a person want to express yourself.

Do you use different value criteria when judging the appearance of people, objects and animals? Why is that and can you give examples, both positive and negative?

Yes I do – i also haven’t manifested a value criteria for objects, people and animals as such, however i judge animals by their cute / scary appearance – i quickly pick up on the style of people, more in the sense of what they are wearing in detail rather than categorising it in a 1 to 10 scale.

Objects.. hmmmm. as much as I’m a designer I think that objects for me are appearing to me in their cultural references. But then the quality of touch also comes in play in a different way than people – it’s rare that i desire to touch the surface of a person, i’d rather go for that sensorial input with certain animals and objects

Pleun van Dijk

Do you consider physical appearance to be a talent and if so how does it rank in comparison to other talents?

I would not consider the physicality of someones appearance to be a talent. A talent is the natural ability to be good at something, which does not apply to the way someone looks. Someones physical appearance could only be seen as a tool needed to express a talent.

Society seems conflicted on notions of beauty, on the one hand describing it as “skin deep” and criticising a preoccupation with looks, but on the other celebrating it in all forms of culture. Where do you stand in this debate?

I would definitely position myself in the middle of this debate. Although I feel the necessity of imperfection I can’t deny being part of the preoccupation with looks. What’s the most important is that we zoom out once in a while to place things into perspective. By asking questions we get the opportunity to think and rethink our own values.

Do you use different value criteria when judging the appearance of people, objects and animals? Why is that and can you give examples, both positive and negative?

I’m afraid I see quite some similarities between the value criteria I use the judge people and objects. I think this has to do with the idea that we can’t criticise ‘nature’ but we can criticise all “man-made” things we’re surrounded by. Since the objectification of man and the possibilities to become our own creator are growing the judging criteria between objects and people will become similar.

Beitragende
Olle Lundin

Designer
Floriane Misslin

Designer
Pleun van Dijk

Designer
Orlando Lovell

Designer
Emma Lucek

Designer
Govert Flint

Designer
Sylvan Lanz

Graphic Designer